The art and skill of active listening

An acctive listening is the basis for true understanding.

listening

All human progress starts with communication. Without learning from others, understanding challenges and problems, receiving constructive input and feedback that make us grow, and getting our points across, we can never reach our full potential as creative human beings.

Yet, we are often bad at communication, and what we may perceive as a meaningful dialogue, is too often parallel monologues where two persons are talking, and no one is listening.

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The vital importance of creativity

To make the whole society more creative, a revolution is needed, which collectively demands our creative birth right.

Ideas

Creativity is to come up with new ideas or expressions regardless of what aspect of life it concerns. Creativity is about the creative process – how to dig into a problem and about the result – the idea, the invention, the artwork, the feeling, the laughter. Creativity can range from everyday life’s simple problem solving to artistic expression, research, business development, politics, how we live our lives and how we become happy.

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Take advantage of chance

Serendipity is an unplanned fortunate discovery that could lead to great innovation. But it requires an open mind.

serendipity

When enough people in different ways seek solutions to different problems, it becomes inevitable that chance does not only pose problems, but also helps to find new innovative solutions – a phenomenon known as serendipity. The history of science is filled with such stories and some of the most spectacular discoveries can be attributed to a combination of happy coincidence and scientists with the ability to see and take advantage of the opportunities.

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The important question “Why?”

why2

When asking questions, it is important not only to settle with the answers given to us, but to constantly expand our understanding by posing the simple but critical follow-up questions: “Who?“, “What?“, “When?“, “Where?“, “How?” And perhaps most importantly, “Why?” The answers to these questions mean that we do not miss contexts that may not be obvious at first glance. The answers will also open up doors for new questions that give us an even deeper understanding. This understanding, stemming from our curiosity, gives us the ability to see patterns and contexts much earlier than others.

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Life is play – play is life

Play

Play is a vital part of our lives. As young children, it is through play that we gradually learn to master a complex world. In play, the child can mimic the adults, test boundaries and learn how to act and behave in their own environment and react in different situations. But play is not only for children; it also has a number of benefits for adults. In play and playful activities, we can be absorbed and end up in the state of total presence and the feeling of being one with an activity we sometimes call “flow”.

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The importance of a curious mind

Of all our various creative abilities, curiosity is perhaps the most important. It’s hard to imagine any creativity or human development without curiosity; This amazing ability makes us not only interested in our environment but also in ourselves. Curiosity makes us read books. Curiosity makes us ask the question “Why?“. Curiosity is the fuel that drives us forward. It is also through our curiosity that we find the inspiration to change the world. And it is curiosity, not money, which is the biggest driver in research.

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Design thinking

Garage

All good innovative projects are based on human needs. At the beginning of a creative project, it may therefore be helpful to interview as many people as possible to try and make them express not only their obvious needs but also their latent, indirect and unconscious needs. Already Henry Ford realized in the early days of the automotive industry that if he asked people what they wanted, they would have answered “A faster horse”.

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